Monday, November 17, 2008

My favorite Prez (F D R) returns with the NEW NEW DEAL! Hooray! GREAT TIME MAG COVER!


  • Franklin Delano Roosevelt has been reincarnated as Barack Hussein Obama!

  • John McCain will become the head of D H S! / or part of the new "Brain Trust"*


WAIT!  There's more!

  • Doris Kearns Goodwin will become oh-fficial WHO EOP historian!

  • The Chicago Mafia will make sure that ALL hot dogs will be Vienna, boiled,with hot peppers, celery salt, tomato, sweet relish, yellow mustard, pickles and red onions (must be red!) and on a steamed seeded bun! OR they will answer to (my cousin) Rahmbo Emanuel, who may be a new Harry Hopkins

and Rush Limbaugh, who has been losing his voice on the air today, will be SILENCED.

Ah, so.......

fair-ness = doc--trine?

# # # 

ps: I have not framed a time cover since the late mr. s. (Sinatra) in 1998

* *   FDR's Brain(s) Trust

The New Deal witnessed an increased role for intellectuals in government. The Brains Trust, a term coined by James Kieran, a New York Times reporter, refers to the group of academic advisers that FDR gathered to assist him during the 1932 presidential campaign. Initially, the term applied to three Columbia University professors: Raymond Moley, Rexford Guy Tugwell, and Adolph A. Berle, Jr. Within a few months, Basil ("Doc") O'Connor, Samuel I. Rosenman, and Hugh Johnson would join the group. These men would quickly help FDR develop an economic plan whose programs became the backbone of the New Deal: regulation of bank and stock activity, large scale relief and public works programs for people living in both urban and rural areas.

Moley, a professor of government and law who recruited the group, argued that a regressive tax (a flat tax all citizens pay: sales taxes, a flat tax on specific amount of salary, etc.) was the only way to rebuild the economy. Tugwell shaped much of the administration's agricultural policy, believing that the key to easing some of the depression's hardships lay in the ability of the federal government to address the growing imbalance between wages and prices. However, Berle rejected the idea of a planned economy per se, but suggested a "new economic constitutional order," that would include a larger federal role in the balancing of the economy.

In their first one hundred days in office, the Brains Trust helped Roosevelt enact fifteen major laws. One of the most important initiatives was the Banking Act of 1933, which put an end to the banking panic. After the Brains Trust defended its reform recovery program in 1933, it disbanded to make room for other advisers and lawyers capable of legislative draftsmanship.

For more information of the Brains Trust, visit the following web sites:

  • "The New Deal Years" in Franklin Delano Roosevelt: President of the Century on the Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute website
Copyright © 2003. The Eleanor Roosevelt Papers. All rights reserved. 

1 comment:

HighViz PR said...

SOME FACTS FER YOU:

FDR's Brains Trust
The New Deal witnessed an increased role for intellectuals in government. The Brains Trust, a term coined by James Kieran, a New York Times reporter, refers to the group of academic advisers that FDR gathered to assist him during the 1932 presidential campaign. Initially, the term applied to three Columbia University professors: Raymond Moley, Rexford Guy Tugwell, and Adolph A. Berle, Jr. Within a few months, Basil ("Doc") O'Connor, Samuel I. Rosenman, and Hugh Johnson would join the group. These men would quickly help FDR develop an economic plan whose programs became the backbone of the New Deal: regulation of bank and stock activity, large scale relief and public works programs for people living in both urban and rural areas.

Moley, a professor of government and law who recruited the group, argued that a regressive tax (a flat tax all citizens pay: sales taxes, a flat tax on specific amount of salary, etc.) was the only way to rebuild the economy. Tugwell shaped much of the administration's agricultural policy, believing that the key to easing some of the depression's hardships lay in the ability of the federal government to address the growing imbalance between wages and prices. However, Berle rejected the idea of a planned economy per se, but suggested a "new economic constitutional order," that would include a larger federal role in the balancing of the economy.

In their first one hundred days in office, the Brains Trust helped Roosevelt enact fifteen major laws. One of the most important initiatives was the Banking Act of 1933, which put an end to the banking panic. After the Brains Trust defended its reform recovery program in 1933, it disbanded to make room for other advisers and lawyers capable of legislative draftsmanship.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sources:
Graham, Otis L., Jr. and Meghan Robinson Wander. Franklin D. Roosevelt, His Life and Times. New York: Da Capo Press, 1985, 40-41.

Kennedy, David. Freedom From Fear: The American People in Depression and War, 1929-1945. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999, 119-124.

Leuchtenburg, William E. The FDR Years: On Roosevelt and His Legacy. New York: Columbia University Press, 1995, 230, 244.


For more information of the Brains Trust, visit the following web sites:

"The New Deal Years" in Franklin Delano Roosevelt: President of the Century on the Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute website


Back to Glossary Index



Teaching Eleanor Roosevelt > Glossary


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Recommended citation:

The Eleanor Roosevelt Papers."FDR's Brains Trust." Teaching Eleanor Roosevelt, ed. by Allida Black, June Hopkins, et. al. (Hyde Park, New York: Eleanor Roosevelt National Historic Site, 2003). http://www.nps.gov/archive/elro/glossary/brains-trust.htm [Accessed November 17, 2008].


This educational program was prepared by The Eleanor Roosevelt Papers
with funding from the GE Fund through Save America's Treasures.

Copyright © 2003. The Eleanor Roosevelt Papers. All rights reserved.